Last edited by Tauzshura
Friday, May 22, 2020 | History

7 edition of The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia found in the catalog.

The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia

by Allen Meyers

  • 32 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Arcadia Publishing .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sociology,
  • History,
  • History: American,
  • Minority Studies - Ethnic American,
  • United States - State & Local - General

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages128
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7900265M
    ISBN 100738508543
    ISBN 109780738508542

    Strawberry Mansion was home to a number of Philadelphia's wealthiest families in the 19th Century. In , The average home price was higher than 85% of the houses in Philadelphia. Jewish Community. The Jewish community started in the late s, as the community . The Jewish Community Centers (JCC) of Greater Philadelphia operated community and senior centers at locations throughout the city. The centers provided educational, cultural, and social opportunities to Philadelphians regardless of race, creed, or national origin.

    West Philadelphia, nicknamed West Philly, is a section of Philadelphia, there is no official definition of its boundaries, it is generally considered to reach from the western shore of the Schuylkill River, to City Avenue to the northwest, Cobbs Creek to the southwest, and the SEPTA Media/Elwyn Line to the south. An alternate definition includes all city land west of the. Mass Immigration and Communal Chaos. Philadelphia's concern for national Jewish undertakings was virtually overwhelmed by the East European immigration, which began to pour into the city toward the end of the 19 th century. A fairly homogenous community of approximat in was inundated by 15 times its number within 35 years: There were upward of , Jews in the city by

      The Jewish community of Northeast Philadelphia was created by the relocation of secondgeneration eastern European Jews from the neighborhoods of Strawberry Mansion and South, North, and West Philadelphia. Serving more than one hundred thousand Jewish residents at its height, Northeast Philadelphia consisted of ten distinctive neighborhoods. Get this from a library! The Jewish community of South Philadelphia. [Allen Meyers] -- For many Jewish immigrants to America, Philadelphia's row houses provided an instant community of neighbors where they were able to combine the traditions of the Old World with new American ideals.


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The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia by Allen Meyers Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at large/5(5). The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century.

The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at large. Read more Read less Length: pages/5(5).

The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Meyers, Allen. Jewish community of West Philadelphia.

Charleston, SC: Arcadia, © (OCoLC)   The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at : Allen Meyers.

The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at : ArcadiaPublishing.

The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at : Arcadia Publishing Inc.

The Jewish Community of South Philadelphia is a tribute to tradition and pride that will serve as a valuable tool in teaching the history of Jewish immigrants in America. Join Allen Meyers in this exploration of the past that will be enjoyed for generations to come.5/5(4).

For many Jewish immigrants to America, Philadelphia's row houses provided an instant community of neighbors where they were able to combine the traditions of the Old World with new American ideals.

Agree that this book missed some important neighborhood of Jewish West Philly, especially the area south of Market St and north of Baltimore Ave. but otherwise found it to be an interesting read. The Author exhaustively interviewed my mother and I for many hours, about my dad's Hoagie Shop, which was sort of a central meeting place and corner /5.

The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at large. The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century.

The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at large%(). Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Images of America: Jewish Community of West Philadelphia by Allen Meyers (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia portrays Jewish life throughout West Philadelphia in the mid-twentieth century. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at large.

Hardcover. The book captures rare, nearly forgotten images with photographs gleaned from the community at large. The Jewish community of Philadelphia west of the Schuylkill River is a composite of seven distinct neighborhoods surrounding West Philadelphia proper.

These include Fortieth and Girard, Parkside, Wynnefield, Overbrook Park, Wynnefield Heights. The Jewish Community around North Broad Street weaves the tale of the Jewish community in this part of Philadelphia through a collection of rare and stunning images.

The construction of the North Broad Street subway in the s and the row house Jewish community known as Logan are parts of this story.5/5(3). This was officially adopted on Octo The Jewish signers included Benjamin Levy, David Franks, Samson Levy, Hyman Levy Jr., Mathias Bush, Moses Mordecai, Michael Gratz, and Barnard Gratz.

The last two were brothers who had left Upper Silesia. According to Allen Meyers’ The Jewish Community of West Philadelphia (Acadia Publishing, ), the WPJCC formed in the early s, and the building followed other synagogue center models, “with space for athletic(s) in addition to social and religious programs.” Architects Edwin Silverman and Andrew Sauer teamed for the design of the Richardsonian Romanesque building, across the street.

Allen Katz, former student at the Yiddish Folkshul in the Wynnefield neighborhood of West Philadelphia, shares his memories of growing up in a heavily Jewish neighborhood.

This is an excerpt from an oral history with Allen Katz. In the row homes of South Philadelphia, there once stood more than one hundred active shuls (synagogues). Native South Philadelphian David Berg paints a picture of the ritual and culture of the synagogue, wondrous in a child’s eye, where Jewish immigrants socialized, observed, and organized—often af yidish (in Yiddish).The synagogue David Berg‘s grandfather belonged to is the.

There has been a very modest return of Jewish families and individuals to West Philadelphia's University City. The last synagogue in the area closed in the s, but by a Reconstructionist Shul, Kol Tzedek, came into being at Calvary Center on Baltimore Ave. and 48th.The Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia is committed to providing essential resources during the international crisis caused by the COVID Coronavirus.

We are coordinating with all Jewish-affiliated organizations, schools, synagogues and agencies in the region to assess and address emerging needs.At one time, the former community center served as a focal point for families in a once-vibrant West Philadelphia Jewish community.

The former West Philadelphia Jewish Community Center building at the corner of 63rd and Ludlow Streets is in the process of being torn down as part of a new development program occurring in the neighborhood.